Open Science Workshop on Preregistration for Program

Sunday, May 15, 2022, 12:45 – 2:15 pm EDT, Jasmine/Palm

Organizers: Sabrina Hansmann-Roth, University of Lille; Björn Jörges, York University
Moderator: Sabrina Hansmann-Roth, University of Lille
Speakers: William Ngiam, University of Chicago; Janna Wennberg, UC San Diego

Preregistration has been proposed as a tool to accelerate scientific advancement by making scientific results more robust, more reproducible, and more replicable. In this workshop, we will briefly go over the advantages of preregistered studies and the registered report publication format, and then delve deeper into the practicalities of preregistering studies as applied to the Vision Sciences. A range of topics will be discussed, such as proper specification and formalization of hypotheses, predictions, and data analysis pipelines as well as power analyses. There will also be an introduction to how registered reports go beyond preregistration and can help combat publication bias in the literature.

William Ngiam

University of Chicago

William Ngiam is a postdoctoral researcher in the Awh and Vogel Lab at the University of Chicago, studying how learning and experience influence the representation of visual information in memory, and leveraging that to understand the capacity limits of visual working memory. He is an active advocate for reform to improve science – he serves on the steering committee of ReproducibiliTea, a grassroots initiative to form Open Science communities at academic institutions, and is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal for Reproducibility in Neuroscience, a non-profit diamond open access journal. You can follow him on Twitter @will_ngiam.

Janna Wennberg

UC San Diego

Janna Wennberg is a third-year Ph.D student in psychology at UC San Diego. With Dr. John Serences, she uses behavior, fMRI, and computational modeling to investigate how flexible neural codes support visual attention and working memory. She became interested in open science as an undergraduate through her work with Dr. Julia Strand, a speech perception researcher and leader in the open science movement. She realized that open science practices such as preregistration and registered reports have served as valuable training opportunities for her, and she is interested in exploring how scientific reforms can be tools both for improving research and training early career researchers.

Sabrina Hansmann-Roth

University of Lille

Sabrina Hansmann-Roth is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Lille and the Icelandic Vision Lab. Before that, she obtained her Ph.D. from the Université Paris Descartes. She is interested in the mechanisms used to represent information in visual memory. For that, she investigates probabilistic representations of visual ensembles, visual priming and perceptual biases such as serial dependence. Beyond that, and as a member of the SPC, she is passionate about discussing Open Science particular for Early Career Researchers. Contact Sabrina at or on Twitter: @SHansmann_Roth

Connect With Industry

Saturday, May 14, 2022, 12:45 – 2:15 pm EDT, Horizons

Refreshments and snacks will be available

To reflect the range of interests and career goals of VSS attendees, we are pleased to offer our popular ‘Connect with Industry’ event at VSS 2022. This is an opportunity for our members to interact with representatives of industry and government agencies.

Representatives from companies including Apple, Exponent, Magic Leap, Meta and VPixx will be present to discuss opportunities for vision scientists in their companies and to answer questions about collaborating with, and working within, their organizations.

Two 45-minute sessions will be scheduled (12:45 – 1:30 pm and 1:30 – 2:15 pm). Drop in for one, or stay for both time slots. Representatives will present an introduction to their company/agency at the start of both sessions (12:45 and 1:30 pm).

No sign-ups are required. Although light snacks will be served, please feel free to bring your brown bag lunch to enjoy during the event.

All VSS attendees are welcome.

US Funding Workshop

Thursday, June 2, 2022, 3:30 – 4:30 pm EDT, Zoom Session Log In to Set Timezone

Moderator: Geoffrey Boynton, University of Washington
Discussants: Houmam Araj, National Eye Institute (NIH); Todd Horowitz, National Cancer Institute; Michael Hout, National Science Foundation; and Cheri Wiggs, National Eye Institute (NIH)

You have a great research idea, but you need money to make it happen. You need to write a grant. This workshop will address various funding mechanisms for vision research. Our panelists will discuss their organization’s interests and priorities, and give insight into the inner workings of their extramural research programs. There will be time for your questions.

Houmam Araj

National Eye Institute (NIH)

Houmam Araj., has been with the NIH for over 20 years. He is currently Director of the Lens and Cataract Program; the Oculomotor Systems and Neuro-Ophthalmology Program; the Ocular Pain Program; and the Conference Grants at the National Eye Institute. Dr. Araj is also NEI point of contact for the Diversity/Disability and Re-Entry supplements, and since 2009, he has also been the NEI representative on the CCRP/CounterACT (Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats) Initiative. Over an 18-month period Dr. Araj led the NEI SAVP Program. Prior to becoming Program Director, Houmam served as Scientific Review Officer for ten years: 5 years at the NEI, and 5 years before that at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Among Houmam’s professional activities, and over a 5-year period, he co-led the NIH Common-Fund Transformative High-Resolution Cryoelectron Microscopy (CryoEM) Program as part of the inaugural coordinating committee. He also organized the Ocular Health Subgroup of the Indoor Air Pollution workshop and co-organized the Trans-Agency Scientific Meeting on Developing Medical Countermeasures to Treat the Acute and Chronic Effects of Ocular Chemical Toxicity. Prior to joining NIH, Houmam did a postdoc in the Department of Neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Todd Horowitz

National Cancer Institute

Todd Horowitz, Ph.D., is a Program Director in the Behavioral Research Program’s (BRP) Basic Biobehavioral and Psychological Sciences Branch (BBPSB), located in the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences (DCCPS) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Dr. Horowitz earned his doctorate in Cognitive Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley in 1995. Prior to joining NCI, he was Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School and Associate Director of the Visual Attention Laboratory at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He has published more than 70 peer-reviewed research papers in vision science and cognitive psychology. His research interests include attention, perception, medical image interpretation, cancer-related cognitive impairments, sleep, and circadian rhythms.

Michael Hout

National Science Foundation

Michael Hout, Ph.D., is a Program Director for Perception, Action, and Cognition in the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences directorate (in the Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences division) of the National Science Foundation. He received his undergraduate degree at the University of Pittsburgh and his masters and doctoral degrees from Arizona State University. He is a rotating Program Director on professional leave from New Mexico State University where he runs a lab in the Psychology Department and co-directs an interdisciplinary virtual and augmented reality lab as well. Prior to joining the NSF he was a conference organizer for the Object Perception, Attention, and Memory meeting and was an Associate Editor at Attention, Perception, and Psychophysics. His research focuses primarily on visual cognition (including visual search, attention, and eye movements), spanning both basic theoretical research and applied scenarios such as professional medical/security screening, and search and rescue.

Cheri Wiggs

National Eye Institute (NIH)

Cheri Wiggs, Ph.D., serves as a Program Director at the National Eye Institute (of the National Institutes of Health). She oversees extramural funding through three programs — Perception & Psychophysics, Myopia & Refractive Errors, and Low Vision & Blindness Rehabilitation. She received her PhD from Georgetown University in 1991 and came to the NIH as a researcher in the Laboratory of Brain and Cognition. She made her jump to the administrative side of science in 1998 as a Scientific Review Officer. She currently represents the NEI on several trans-NIH coordinating committees (including BRAIN, Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, Medical Rehabilitation Research) and was appointed to the NEI Director’s Audacious Goals Initiative Working Group.

Geoffrey Boynton

University of Washington

Geoffrey Boyton is a VSS Board Member and studies visual attention, reading and prosthetic vision. After studying mathematics at U.C. San Diego and U.C. Santa Barbara, Dr. Boynton received a PhD in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences at U.C. Santa Barbara in 1994. After a decade at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, CA, he joined the faculty at the University of Washington. In 2019 led an effort to develop a research MRI facility at the new Center for Human Neuroscience in the Department of Psychology which he now directs. He also teaches courses on visual perception and statistics.

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Vision Science: A panel of experts and advocates

Thursday, June 2, 2022, 2:00 – 3:00 pm EDT, Zoom Session Log In to Set Timezone

Organizers: T. Rowan Candy, Indiana University; Anya Hurlbert, Newcastle University; Eileen Kowler, Rutgers University; and Ruth Rosenholtz, MIT
Moderators: T. Rowan Candy, Indiana University; Anya Hurlbert, Newcastle University
Speakers: Genevieve Almouzni, CNRS/Institut Curie; Member, Scientific Council of the European Research Council; Ximena Arriaga, National Science Foundation; Zsuzsa Kaldy, University of Massachusetts Boston; Alejandro Lleras, University of Illinois

The practice and progress of science are best when people with diverse viewpoints and backgrounds all contribute. How do we work to overcome barriers to inclusion that continue to exist? Four distinguished panelists will discuss their activities and advocacy to promote diversity and inclusion in vision science and related fields. Topics to be discussed cover a range of different yet interrelated issues:

  • Inclusive Mentoring and Teaching
  • Strategies for Networking and Making our Field More Diverse
  • Opportunities for Funding your New Ideas

Panelists include those from the US and European funding agencies. The discussion will be relevant to those at all career stages.

Genevieve Almouzni

CNRS/Institut Curie; Member, Scientific Council of the European Research Council

Genevieve Almouzni, PhD, is a world-leading researcher in genomics, combining biochemistry, cell biology and physical approaches with advanced imaging to explore chromatin dynamics in development and disease. Professor Almouzni is director of research exceptional class at the CNRS, EMBO member, member of the French Academy of Sciences, fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, and Director of the Research Center of the Institut Curie from September 2013 to September 2018 and honorary director since then. She has received prestigious grants (ERC Advanced Grants) and awards including the FEBS|EMBO Women in Science Award (2013)  and the Grand prix de Fondation de la Recherche Médicale (FRM) (2014), and has led many Europe-wide life sciences initiatives.

Professor Almouzni is highly engaged in promoting young scientists’ careers.  She is a member of the Scientific Council of the European Research Council, where she has lead responsibility for the Working Group on Gender Issues. Professor Almouzni will share knowledge and experience of the ERC’s work on gender issues as well as actions on Widening European Participation. 

Ximena Arriaga

National Science Foundation

Ximena Arriaga, is a rotating Program Director for the National Science Foundation Social Psychology Program, which is in the Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences Division of the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences Directorate at NSF (BCS-SBE). Dr. Arriaga earned a doctorate in Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her home institution is Purdue University, where she is a Professor of Psychological Sciences and has resided for 20+ years. In addition to holding editorial roles and positions in professional organizations, Dr. Arriaga has worked to support and implement research that can inform efforts to promote inclusive settings and broaden participation in science.

Zsuzsa Kaldy

University of Massachusetts Boston

Dr. Zsuzsa Kaldy received her M.A. in Psychology from Eotvos Lorand University, in Budapest, Hungary, and her M.S. and Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology from Rutgers University. She has been a member of the faculty of the Department of Psychology at the University of Massachusetts Boston since 2003, where she is currently Professor. Her main research focus is on the early development of visual attention and working memory. She has developed several innovative experimental paradigms to study these processes, using eye-tracking and pupillometry in typically developing infants and toddlers. In collaboration with Alice Carter and Erik Blaser (UMass Boston), she has also been investigating the unusual profile of visual attentional skills in 2-year-olds diagnosed with autism. Dr. Kaldy’s work has been funded by NIH (NEI, NICHD) and the Simons Foundation.

Zsuzsa Kaldy has been leading a research lab studying the development of visual attention and working memory at UMass Boston, a Minority Serving Institution, for almost twenty years. Together with Erik Blaser, she has been the recipient of four NIH R15 (Academic Research Enhancement Award) grants. From her perspective as a white European immigrant to the US, she is going to talk about strategies for the successful recruitment and mentoring of undergraduate students from minoritized backgrounds at a large urban university. Instead of talking about a ‘leaky pipeline’, her guiding metaphor is that individuals from historically underrepresented groups in science face a ‘hostile obstacle course’ (Berhe et al., 2021).

Alejandro Lleras

University of Illinois

Alejandro Lleras is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he co-directs the Vision Lab. Alejandro also serves as the Assistant Head for Diversity and Inclusion in the Department of Psychology at Illinois, and has served as an advisor on Diversity and Inclusion issues to a number of organizations, including VSS. He is also a co-founder and governing board member of the non-for-profit SPARK society, a group aimed at increasing the participation and visibility of scholars belonging to historically-marginalized groups in the cognitive sciences. Contact Alejandro at

T. Rowan Candy

Indiana University

T. Rowan Candy is a Professor and the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in the School of Optometry & Vision Science at Indiana University.  She is currently serving on the Board of Directors of VSS and its Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee.  After training as an optometrist (Univ. of Wales) she completed a PhD in Vision Science (UC Berkeley) and post-doctoral training (Smith-Kettlewell) in visual development. Her NIH-funded research is focused on the typical and atypical visual development of human infants in the context of information available in the natural environment and how it drives visual and ocular motor development.  She is a past chair of the Indiana University Bloomington Women in Science Program’s faculty advisory board and currently serves on the editorial board of the Annual Review of Vision Science.

Anya Hurlbert

Newcastle University

Anya Hurlbert is a Professor of Visual Neuroscience and Dean of Advancement at Newcastle University. She trained as a physicist (BA, Princeton University), physiologist (MA, Cambridge University), neuroscientist (PhD, Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT), and physician (MD, Harvard Medical School), and did postdoctoral research in vision science at Oxford University.  She co-founded the Institute of Neuroscience at Newcastle University in 2003, serving as its co-Director until 2014.  Hurlbert’s research focuses on colour perception and its role in cognition. She is also interested in applied areas such as biomedical image processing, digital imaging and novel lighting technologies.  Professor Hurlbert actively promotes public engagement with science and women in STEM, and has devised and co-curated several science-based art exhibitions. She is former Chairman of the Colour Group (GB) and Scientist Trustee of the National Gallery, and currently on the editorial board of the Journal of Vision and the Rank Prize Funds Optoelectronics Committee.  She is a member of the VSS board, and serves on its Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee.

Open Science Workshop on Preregistration

Sunday, May 15, 2022, 12:45 – 2:15 pm EDT, Jasmine/Palm

Organizers: Sabrina Hansmann-Roth, University of Lille; Björn Jörges, York University
Moderator: Sabrina Hansmann-Roth, University of Lille
Speakers: William Ngiam, University of Chicago; Janna Wennberg, UC San Diego

Preregistration has been proposed as a tool to accelerate scientific advancement by making scientific results more robust, more reproducible, and more replicable. In this workshop, we will briefly go over the advantages of preregistered studies and the registered report publication format, and then delve deeper into the practicalities of preregistering studies as applied to the Vision Sciences. A range of topics will be discussed, such as proper specification and formalization of hypotheses, predictions, and data analysis pipelines as well as power analyses. There will also be an introduction to how registered reports go beyond preregistration and can help combat publication bias in the literature.

William Ngiam

University of Chicago

William Ngiam is a postdoctoral researcher in the Awh and Vogel Lab at the University of Chicago, studying how learning and experience influence the representation of visual information in memory, and leveraging that to understand the capacity limits of visual working memory. He is an active advocate for reform to improve science – he serves on the steering committee of ReproducibiliTea, a grassroots initiative to form Open Science communities at academic institutions, and is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal for Reproducibility in Neuroscience, a non-profit diamond open access journal. You can follow him on Twitter @will_ngiam.

Janna Wennberg

UC San Diego

Janna Wennberg is a third-year Ph.D student in psychology at UC San Diego. With Dr. John Serences, she uses behavior, fMRI, and computational modeling to investigate how flexible neural codes support visual attention and working memory. She became interested in open science as an undergraduate through her work with Dr. Julia Strand, a speech perception researcher and leader in the open science movement. She realized that open science practices such as preregistration and registered reports have served as valuable training opportunities for her, and she is interested in exploring how scientific reforms can be tools both for improving research and training early career researchers.

Sabrina Hansmann-Roth

University of Lille

Sabrina Hansmann-Roth is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Lille and the Icelandic Vision Lab. Before that, she obtained her Ph.D. from the Université Paris Descartes. She is interested in the mechanisms used to represent information in visual memory. For that, she investigates probabilistic representations of visual ensembles, visual priming and perceptual biases such as serial dependence. Beyond that, and as a member of the SPC, she is passionate about discussing Open Science particular for Early Career Researchers. Contact Sabrina at or on Twitter: @SHansmann_Roth

Open Science Workshop on Preregistration

Thursday, June 2, 2022, 12:30 – 2:00 pm EDT, Zoom Session Log In to Set Timezone

Organizers: Sabrina Hansmann-Roth, University of Lille; Björn Jörges, York University
Moderator: Sabrina Hansmann-Roth, University of Lille
Speakers: William Ngiam, University of Chicago; Janna Wennberg, UC San Diego

Preregistration has been proposed as a tool to accelerate scientific advancement by making scientific results more robust, more reproducible, and more replicable. In this workshop, we will briefly go over the advantages of preregistered studies and the registered report publication format, and then delve deeper into the practicalities of preregistering studies as applied to the Vision Sciences. A range of topics will be discussed, such as proper specification and formalization of hypotheses, predictions, and data analysis pipelines as well as power analyses. There will also be an introduction to how registered reports go beyond preregistration and can help combat publication bias in the literature.

William Ngiam

University of Chicago

William Ngiam is a postdoctoral researcher in the Awh and Vogel Lab at the University of Chicago, studying how learning and experience influence the representation of visual information in memory, and leveraging that to understand the capacity limits of visual working memory. He is an active advocate for reform to improve science – he serves on the steering committee of ReproducibiliTea, a grassroots initiative to form Open Science communities at academic institutions, and is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal for Reproducibility in Neuroscience, a non-profit diamond open access journal. You can follow him on Twitter @will_ngiam.

Janna Wennberg

UC San Diego

Janna Wennberg is a third year Ph.D student in psychology at UC San Diego. With Dr. John Serences, she uses behavior, fMRI, and computational modeling to investigate how flexible neural codes support visual attention and working memory. She became interested in open science as an undergraduate through her work with Dr. Julia Strand, a speech perception researcher and leader in the open science movement. She realized that open science practices such as preregistration and registered reports have served as valuable training opportunities for her, and she is interested in exploring how scientific reforms can be tools both for improving research and training early career researchers.

Sabrina Hansmann-Roth

University of Lille

Sabrina Hansmann-Roth is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Lille and the Icelandic Vision Lab. Before that, she obtained her Ph.D. from the Université Paris Descartes. She is interested in the mechanisms used to represent information in visual memory. For that, she investigates probabilistic representations of visual ensembles, visual priming and perceptual biases such as serial dependence. Beyond that, and as a member of the SPC, she is passionate about discussing Open Science particular for Early Career Researchers. Contact Sabrina at or on Twitter: @SHansmann_Roth

Accessibility in Vision Science: A Roundtable Discussion

Wednesday, June 1, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 pm EDT, Zoom Session Log In to Set Timezone

Organizers: Takuma Morimoto, University of Oxford; Doug Addleman, Dartmouth College
Moderator: Doug Addleman, Dartmouth College
Speakers: Blaire Dube, The Ohio State University; Masataka Sawayama, Inria Bordeaux Sud Ouest; Yueh-Hsun (Walter) Wu, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Promoting diversity and inclusion is a key consideration in building a strong scientific community. This year’s event will focus on accessibility in the vision science community for three groups: (i) researchers with sensory loss and other disabilities, (ii) first-generation students, and (iii) non-native English speakers. We will discuss barriers that underrepresented researchers might experience and seek potential solutions to mitigate or eliminate those barriers. Introductory presentations from panelists will be followed by small group discussion in breakout rooms. There will be a concluding roundtable discussion with the panelists about the problems and insights brought up in these smaller groups. Through this event, we seek to raise awareness of these issues and help VSS as a society and individual members to improve accessibility in their scientific communities. This event addresses the concerns of early career researchers but should be of interest to researchers at all career stages.

Blaire Dube

The Ohio State University

Blaire Dube, is a 3rd year Postdoctoral Fellow in Julie Golomb’s lab at The Ohio State University. She studies interactions between visual attention and visual working memory during goal-driven behavior using behavioral, eye-tracking, computational modeling, and fMRI methods. She is also a previous OPAM organizer and is passionate about supporting early-career researchers and increasing accessibility in her scientific communities. Blaire is a first-generation academic with perspectives on hidden curriculum and barriers inherent in academia.

Masataka Sawayama

Inria Bordeaux Sud Ouest

Masataka Sawayama, is a postdoctoral researcher at INRIA, France. During his career, he has mainly focused on understanding functional mechanisms underlying the perception of object attributes such as material, color, texture, or shape. He has recently engaged in integrating vision science and machine learning methodologies to contribute to scientific advances in both research areas. He grew up in Japan and received his Ph.D. from Chiba University in Japan. He moved to INRIA to pursue his postdoctoral research.  Contact Masataka at 

Yueh-Hsun (Walter) Wu

University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Yueh-Hsun (Walter) Wu is currently a Psychology Ph.D. candidate with a Translational Sensory Science minor at the University of Minnesota. Walter is also one of the founding members of the International Network of Researchers with Vision Impairment and their Allies (INOVA). Walter’s research focuses on different topics related to the impact of impaired vision on daily activities, and the usage of assistive technologies in people with low vision.
 

Doug Addleman

Dartmouth College

Doug Addleman is a postdoctoral researcher at Dartmouth College, before which he earned his Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Minnesota. He studies selective attention, focusing on experience-driven attention, attention in multiple modalities, and the effects of vision loss on spatial attention. As a member of the VSS Student-Postdoc Advisory Committee, Doug is committed to advocating for the diverse interests and identities of vision scientists in training.

Non-Academic Careers Panel

Thursday, June 2, 2022, 5:00 – 6:00 pm EDT, Zoom Session Log In to Set Timezone

Organizers: Geoffrey Boynton, University of Washington and Ruth Rosenholtz, MIT
Moderator: Ruth Rosenholtz, MIT
Speakers: Andrew Watson, Apple; James Hillis, Oculus; Eric Seemiller, Wright Patterson Air Force; Peter April, VPixx Technologies; Oliver Flynn, FDA

So you have a PhD in vision science – now what? What opportunities are available outside of academia? What are the advantages and disadvantages of academic vs. other careers? How do I get a job in industry/government/a startup? How do expectations differ? These questions and more will be addressed in a one-hour session. Panelists will make short presentations, followed by Q&A and an interactive discussion with the audience and panel.

Peter April

CEO, VPixx Technologies

Peter April is CEO of VPixx Technologies. Originally inspired by Isaac Asimov’s portrayal of sentient robots, Mr. April is driven to help neuroscientists better understand the nature of consciousness. VPixx has assembled a unique team of talented scientists and engineers, and together we create the specialized stimulation and data acquisition instruments required by the world’s leading neuroscience researchers.
 
 

Oliver Flynn

Vision scientist and regulatory scientist in the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

Oliver Flynn, Ph.D. (he/him) is a vision scientist and medical device reviewer in the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). He earned a Ph.D. from American University in Washington, DC, in 2016, where his research focused on human visual perception of motion and contrast. From 2016 to 2020, he conducted postdoctoral research in the clinic at the National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, in Bethesda, Maryland. This research centered on rod-mediated visual function changes in elderly patients with genetic and age-related eye diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), Stargardt disease, and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and their relationship to the structural changes detected by clinicians. At FDA, Dr. Flynn applies his knowledge and experience in visual function testing and clinical trials to regulate ophthalmic devices before and after they enter the U.S. market. He works with multi-disciplinary teams of experts, including engineers, chemists, and clinicians, to ensure that devices are safe and effective for U.S. consumers. These devices include intraocular lens implants, pediatric in-home treatments, and screening tools. He lives in Washington, DC.

James Hillis

Research Scientists, Oculus

Dr. Hillis completed a Ph.D in Vision Science with Dr. Martin Banks at UC Berkeley on cue-integration and 3D shape perception. He worked in academia for the next 10 years: first as a post-post-doctoral research fellow at the University of Pennsylvania and then as an assistant Professor at the University of Glasgow. He then moved to industry, first as a color scientist at 3M and then as a research scientist at Meta (previously Oculus research). The latter position has involved developing perceptual quality metrics for AR/VR and research using models of perception and cognition to advance approaches to human-computer interaction. Overall, his research has spanned questions on color and space perception, visual search, spatial sound perception, multi-sensory integration, social interaction and models of higher level cognition for controlling human-computer interaction.

Eric Seemiller

Senior Vision Scientist, Wright Patterson Air Force

Eric Seemiller completed his PhD in vision science at Indiana University. Following postdoctoral studies at Smith-Kettlewell, the University of Texas-Austin, and back at Indiana University, he took a position as the Senior Vision Scientist at the United States Air Force Operational Based Vision Assessment Laboratory (OBVA) at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Though the visual environment of airmen has changed dramatically since the early days of the Air Force, many of the vision screening tests have not been updated at all. The overarching goal of the OBVA is to design and implement more relevant, reliable, and usable aeromedical vision screening tests and tools for incoming airmen. This involves both classic visual psychophysics, vision modeling, and the design of visually faithful flight and flying task simulation. OBVA partners with a number of industry and academic labs, along with colleagues in the other service branches. They also operate several state-of-the-art simulators to get at the heart of what aspects of the visual system are most relevant for operational success.

Andrew Watson

Chief Vision Scientist, Apple, Panel Process & Optics

Andrew Watson is the Chief Vision Scientist at Apple  in Cupertino, California. He leads the application of vision science to a broad range of Apple technologies, applications, devices and displays.

Dr. Watson was an undergraduate at Columbia University and received a PhD in Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania. He subsequently held postdoctoral positions at the University of Cambridge in England and at Stanford University in California. From 1982 to 2016 he was the Senior Scientist for Vision Research at NASA Ames Research Center in California.

His research focuses on computational models of early vision, including spatial, temporal and motion processing, and application of vision science to imaging technology. He is the author of over 100 scientific papers, and he has seven patents, in areas such as acuity measurement, image compression, video quality, and measurement of display artifacts. He has 20,761 citations and an h-index of 63.

In 2001, Watson founded the Journal of Vision, where he served as Editor-in-Chief for 2001-2013 and 2018-2022.

Dr. Watson is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America, a Gold Fellow of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, and a Fellow of the Society for Information Display. He recently served on the Board of Directors of the Vision Sciences Society. He currently serves as the Vice Chair for Vision Science and Human Factors of the International Committee on Display Measurement. In 1990, he received the H. Julian Allen Award from NASA. He is the 2007 recipient of the Otto Schade Award from the Society for Information Display, and the 2008 winner of the Special Recognition Award from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. In 2016 he received the Holst Award from Philips Research and The Technical University of Eindhoven. In 2011, he received the Presidential Rank Award from the President of the United States.

Ruth Rosenholtz

Principal Research Scientist, MIT

Ruth Rosenholtz has explored a number of non-traditional career paths in vision science. Currently a Principal Research Scientist (read: soft money research faculty) in the Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, she did a postdoc at NASA Ames and worked at Xerox PARC for a number of years as a researcher, then as a manager of a group charged with transitioning image processing-based research into products. She studies a wide range of visual phenomena, as well as applied vision, using a mix of behavioral methods and computational modeling. Her main research topics include attention and visual search; perceptual organization; and peripheral vision.

Vision Sciences Society